Oriental bittersweet fruit

Oriental bittersweet fruit

June 14, 2014 – 03:37 am

The cold weather has begun to set in here in southeast Minnesota! The leaves have been changing colors and many plants are losing their leaves, which means it is time to cut and spray invasive...

Oriental Bittersweet Identification

Oriental Bittersweet Identification

June 27, 2014 – 07:38 am

Last weekend I noticed the orange berries of Oriental Bittersweet are everywhere, beside roads, in yards and in the treetops. I learnt about Oriental Bittersweet at a presentation by Barbara...

Oriental bittersweet vine poisonous

Oriental bittersweet vine poisonous

June 28, 2014 – 08:01 am

By Bruce Wenning Asiatic Bittersweet Vine Common Names: Asiatic bittersweet vine; Oriental bittersweet vine; Chinese bittersweet vine. Plant Taxonomy: Family Celastraceae. Genus Celastrus...

Oriental bittersweet Canada

Oriental bittersweet Canada

July 2, 2014 – 09:03 am

Oriental bittersweet Celastrus orbiculatus : Oriental bittersweet, Real Canada Goose Jackets while beautiful, is destructive and hard to eradicate, being among the worst of North America’s...

Oriental bittersweet American

Oriental bittersweet American

July 3, 2014 – 09:07 am

Tivon Feeley, Forest Health Program Leader for the Iowa Department of Natural Resources, sounded a warning to avoid using oriental bittersweet in holiday wreaths. The woody vine with its...

Oriental bittersweet New York

Oriental bittersweet New York

July 13, 2014 – 11:39 am

Here s another leftover from the New York trip. Marie wanted to show me some fantastic vines she had found. They were curling all over the woods, and each other. When the vines got large...

Oriental Bittersweet Problems

Oriental Bittersweet Problems

August 1, 2014 – 04:26 pm

Like so many other species in Indiana, there is a native version and an alien version of Bittersweet. This is the alien version, Celastrus orbiculatus. The native version is called American...

Oriental bittersweet New Hampshire

Oriental bittersweet New Hampshire

August 3, 2014 – 04:56 pm

I found myself in a pocket of beech trees one day and took a few photos. Beech and oak and a few shrubs are all we have for colorful foliage now. American beeches (Fagus grandifolia) have...

Why is Oriental bittersweet invasive?

Why is Oriental bittersweet invasive?

August 5, 2014 – 05:20 pm

Bright red berries make oriental bittersweet an attractive decoration, but those berries are viable as seeds that have helped spread this invasive species. The Iowa Department of Natural...

Oriental bittersweet herbicide control

Oriental bittersweet herbicide control

August 7, 2014 – 05:54 pm

Fall has officially arrived! The forest is once again adorned in vibrant shades of red, orange, and yellow, and so are many of the local homes and businesses. In fact, many of the decorations...

Latest Entries

Oriental Bittersweet

Oriental bittersweet herbicide control

Oriental bittersweet herbicide control

Fall has officially arrived! The forest is once again adorned in vibrant shades of red, orange, and yellow, and so are many of the local homes and businesses. In fact, many of the decorations used in these homes and businesses are made from plants that were collected from our forests, such as Oriental bittersweet. Oriental bittersweet was introduced to the United States, from Eastern Asia, in the mid-1800s as an ornamental plant. Its woody stems and persistent…


Climbing Plant

Climbing Plants Evergreen Trellis

Climbing Plants Evergreen Trellis

Skogholm Bear BerryHoneysuckle Henryi Occasionally, it suffices to plant semi-wintergreen plants, which will reduce the leafless period from 4-5 to 1-3 months. Akebia and some new, more frequently flowering Climbing Roses belong to this group. However, all these plants need a moist soil throughout winter! Depending on the harshness of the winter, the leaves of some Clematis and Honeysuckles remain green until the following spring, but often they start to…


Oriental Bittersweet

Why is Oriental bittersweet invasive?

Why is Oriental bittersweet invasive?

Bright red berries make oriental bittersweet an attractive decoration, but those berries are viable as seeds that have helped spread this invasive species. The Iowa Department of Natural Resources, along with other groups, needs volunteers to help remove oriental bittersweet from one of Iowa’s parks. See more from the DNR: DUBUQUE – The Iowa Department of Natural Resources, 1 Mississippi, and the Iowa Natural Heritage Foundation are looking for volunteers from…


Climbing Hydrangea

When does Climbing Hydrangea bloom

When does Climbing Hydrangea bloom

An anomaly in the Hydrangea family H. anomala is a true vining climber. It can get upwards of 50 high if it has a nice tree to cling onto with its aerial roots. It will drape its large 10 flower heads throughout your woodland garden if given the chance to grow. Will definitely be the highlight of any yard when it is cascading it s blooms throughout your tree branches. Plant Care Planting: Dig a hole one foot wider and about as deep as the plant s root ball…


Oriental Bittersweet

Oriental bittersweet New Hampshire

Oriental bittersweet New Hampshire

I found myself in a pocket of beech trees one day and took a few photos. Beech and oak and a few shrubs are all we have for colorful foliage now. American beeches (Fagus grandifolia) have great fall color that starts when maples, birches, and others are finishing. Beech colors don’t last long though, and before you know it the leaves turn brown and curl. Like some oak leaves most beech leaves will stay on the younger trees through winter, rattling in the wind…


Climbing Plant

Climbing plants for sunny areas

Climbing plants for sunny areas

Plants are not only decorative but can also be useful as they can be used to disguise eyesores, bins, posts, walls and/or fences and, if the correct plants are chosen, can also be effective a means of security. There are many different plants from which to choose, all with different attributes. Some are fast growing and will, therefore, provide quick cover whilst others only flourish annually. Here are just a few suggestions of plants, their characteristics…


Oriental Bittersweet

Oriental Bittersweet Problems

Oriental Bittersweet Problems

Like so many other species in Indiana, there is a native version and an alien version of Bittersweet. This is the alien version, Celastrus orbiculatus. The native version is called American Bittersweet (Celastrus scandens). In some parts of the U.S. the Oriental Bittersweet is an invasive problem. Around northeast Indiana, I’ve only seen it in a couple of places where it’s not really taking over at all. I’ve heard that it’s a real problem in the dunes area…


Climbing Hydrangea

Climbing Hydrangea Colours

Climbing Hydrangea Colours

Hydrangea (anomala) petiolaris The Climbing Hydrangea is a popular self-clinging climber (sticker) and much appreciated for its white (peripheral) flowers. Semi-shaded to shaded, acid to neutral soil with plenty of humus, definitely moist or even wet soil. Soil compaction and lime are not well tolerated. Sticker which climbs with the help of adhesive aerial rootlets, growth rate and height less than ivy. Foliage from April / May until end of October, yellow…


Climbing Hydrangea

Climbing Hydrangea Decumaria barbara

Climbing Hydrangea Decumaria barbara

Botanical/Latin Name: Decumaria barbara Common Names: Climbing Wild Hydrangea, Wood Vamp Type of Plant: Woody Vine to 40. Native Range: Moist Situations, Southeastern U. S. Reported Hardiness: Zones 6-9. Bloom Color: White. Cultivation and Uses: The best vine for a damp site, Climbing Hydrangea will stick to whatever it is growing near. Aerial rootlets line the stems of this vine, making it the vine to use when you want something that is guaranteed to not come…


Climbing Plant

Climbing plants yellow flowers

Climbing plants yellow flowers

Few yellow flowers are more recognizable than cheery sunflowers. And happily for gardeners, this group of plants offers a wonderful array of varieties, from compact 3-foot-tall varieties such as Teddy Bear to giant 12-foot-tall varieties such as Mammoth Grey Stripe that offer 12-inch-wide blooms. Name: Helianthus annuus selections Size: From 3 to 12 feet tall, depending on variety. Growing conditions: Full sun and well-drained soil Zones: Annual Black-Eyed…